University of Houston Writing Center
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WID Workshop Descriptions


Paragraph Structure and Relevant Information

This workshop identifies techniques and practices skills for effectively structuring written assignments and developing effective paragraphs. The focus of this workshop is directed toward paragraph structures and identifying information relevant to purpose and topic.

Self-Editing Strategies

This exercise-focused workshop introduces techniques and strategies to help students develop and practice skills relevant to the revision and self-editing process, including grammar and proofreading skills specifically for non-native speakers of English.

Knowing Your Audience

This interactive workshop provides instruction on tailoring your writing to the needs and expectations of your audience.

Tone in Professional Communications

This workshop reviews the common forms of communication - such as letters, memos, and e-mails - and their standard components. Particular attention is paid to using an appropriate tone in professional communication documents.

Presentations

This workshop discusses preparing and delivering effective presentations. It focuses particularly on the design and composition of posters and PowerPoint slides, as well as provides instruction on generally effective technical communication strategies.

Working with Sources

This workshop focuses on the effective use of credible sources in academic writing. In addition to covering topics such as conducting effective research and the importance of avoiding plagiarism, the workshop focuses on the rhetorical benefit of effectively using sources in order to further the purpose of your writing with respect to your audience.

APA Style and Effective Citation


This workshop explores the purpose of formatting and consistent use of APA style, as well as discusses conducting effective research and avoiding plagiarism.

Abstracts, Introductions, and Context in Technical Reports

This workshop focuses on perhaps the most important and difficult to write element of engineering reports: the abstract. In addition to discussing the purpose, content, and style of different types of abstracts, this workshop examines introduction & background sections in various types of reports and the importance of conveying the context of a project.

Extended Abstracts


This workshop examines the structure and content of extended abstracts. During the workshop, students analyze and discuss several examples of extended abstracts written by past students of the University.

Proposals

This interactive workshop reviews the structure, components, and contents of a technical proposal report.

Progress Reports


This workshop instructs students on the nature of a progress report and provides preparation strategies to aid students in the writing process. The workshop relies on the group discussion of both good and bad examples to help students recognize quality report writing.

Using Graphics in Reports

This workshop examines the effective use and integration of graphically represented information within technical reports.

APA Style and Effective Citation


This workshop explores the purpose of formatting and consistent use of APA style, as well as discusses conducting effective research and avoiding plagiarism.

Abstracts, Introductions, and Context in Technical Reports

This workshop focuses on perhaps the most important and difficult to write element of engineering reports: the abstract. In addition to discussing the purpose, content, and style of different types of abstracts, this workshop examines introduction & background sections in various types of reports and the importance of conveying the context of a project.

Writing Engineering Reports: Abstracts, Intros, and Conclusions


Writing abstracts, introductions and conclusions in engineering requires students to develop skills in concrete and concise writing. In this workshop, students learn the specific purpose of each of these sections, and how to effectively develop and communicate the information needed to summarize, introduce, and conclude their technical reports.

Writing Engineering Reports: Proposals

Without a persuasive proposal, an engineer may never get the necessary funding and approval to implement his/her ideas. In this workshop, students learn the art of persuasion while communicating their ideas clearly and objectively.

Writing Engineering Reports: Progress Reports


Once work begins on an engineering job, the engineer often will need to provide ongoing updates on the progress of the job. Students review ways of writing progress reports so that they build confidence and trust in their clients.

Writing Engineering Reports: Final Technical Reports

Final Reports in engineering serve the purpose of communicating to the specific audience the discovery, research, analysis, and implications of a particular technical subject. Students hone their skills in writing clear, concise, objective reports detailing their findings.

Writing Engineering Reports: Extended Abstracts


The information provided in an extended abstract is oftentimes the only information that a busy engineer or manager will read when making a decision. In this workshop, students learn the art of providing key information with the substance and structure of a full report in the concise manner of an extended abstract.

Engineering Reports: Presentations and Poster

The skills learned in writing help students to effectively present their ideas orally and visually. This workshop helps students in their oral communication and presentation.

Writing Engineering Reports: Problem Statements, Context and Background


Often times the hardest but most important concepts for engineering students to communicate, the problem statement, context and background provide the answers to essential questions the audience of an engineering report may ask: What brought them to the problem needing to be solved? Why should the audience care about their solution? In this workshop, students learn to effectively develop and communicate the problem, context and background of their ideas.

Argument and Eloquence in Writing

Writing eloquently means communicating ideas in such a way that the reader is engaged with the text and fully attuned to the nuances of the arguments. Such writing requires skills in organization, coherent writing, development of ideas, and correctness in language usage. Argument and eloquence in writing provides students with ways to take their writing to a new level of communication.

The Revision Process


Writing is a process. It begins with the conception of an idea, and, does not end until that idea is communicated in as effective a manner as possible. After the initial writing of a paper, authors should go through a process of revision at multiple levels: idea, organization, and mechanics. Tailored to individual disciplines, this workshop takes students through the steps of revising a paper.